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Publication: The H275Y neuraminidase mutation of the pandemic A/H1N1 virus lengthens the eclipse phase and reduces viral output of infected cells, potentially compromising fitness in ferrets

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Title The H275Y neuraminidase mutation of the pandemic A/H1N1 virus lengthens the eclipse phase and reduces viral output of infected cells, potentially compromising fitness in ferrets
Authors/Editors* Pinilla, LT, BP Holder, Y Abed, G Boivin, and CAA Beauchemin
Where published* Journal of Virology
How published* Journal
Year* 2012
Volume 86
Number 19
Pages
Publisher
Keywords
Link http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.07244-11
Abstract
The H275Y amino acid substitution of the neuraminidase gene is the most common mutation conferring oseltamivir resistance in the N1 subtype of the influenza virus. Using a mathematical model to analyze a set of in vitro experiments that allow for the full characterization of the viral replication cycle, we show that the primary effects of the H275Y substitution on the pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm09) strain are to lengthen the mean eclipse phase of infected cells (from 6.6 to 9.1 h) and decrease (by 7-fold) the viral burst size, i.e., the total number of virions produced per cell. We also find, however, that the infectious-unit-to-particle ratio of the H275Y mutant strain is 12-fold higher than that of the oseltamivir-susceptible strain (0.19 versus 0.016 per RNA copy). A parallel analysis of the H275Y mutation in the prior seasonal A/Brisbane/59/2007 background shows similar changes in the infection kinetic parameters, but in this background, the H275Y mutation also allows the mutant to infect cells five times more rapidly. Competitive mixed-strain infections in vitro, where the susceptible and resistant H1N1pdm09 strains must compete for cells, are characterized by higher viral production by the susceptible strain but suggest equivalent fractions of infected cells in the culture. In ferrets, however, the mutant strain appears to suffer a delay in its infection of the respiratory tract that allows the susceptible strain to dominate mixed-strain infections.
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